Unit 4: Image #2 – The Evolving Look of Today’s Classrooms

 

This week’s lesson clicked, literally.  I was feeling a bit underwhelmed by the course, unsure if it was the right fit for me.  I agree with Dylan, I felt refreshed by the format of the lesson.  Then we listened to the podcasts/videos from Bart Cote and Guy Tetrault and it confirmed that I am in the right course, that I do have something to contribute and that I can expand my learning!  I felt as though I fit in with the pedagogy that these two gentlemen have set out for their divisions.  I felt as I was not alone on a lost island, being the only person to think this way, and want the same things as these gentlemen do.

As a mature undergrad student, I felt that the way I was being taught to teach was outdated – there was a better way to reach kids.  I had been an educational assistant for a long time before embarking on my journey to becoming an educator.  I also had children of my own – and had an idea of the type of teacher I wanted to be – I wanted to teach every student in the manner that I would want my own son’s taught.  Entering into M.Ed, I met professors that I connected with.  Alec Couros has had a profound impact on my education pathway.  Throughout his courses, he and Katia have led me towards an evolution of the classroom ecosystems that I have built.  Marc Spooner taught me that being creative could happen in many forms and that students could excel once they were allowed to explore their own learning styles.

connected classroom

This week, I connected with Bart Cote and Regina Catholic School Divisions ideology of technological leaders.  The connections that he was speaking about to those that I employ with my student’s as deep learners lined up perfectly, as it should because it is by Michael Fullan.

I really appreciated the SAMR model, although I have had the opportunity to explore it in the past, Bart’s explanation of not always staying in the deep end or you will drown hit home.  Today in our classrooms, teachers are asked to perform so many tasks while staying on top of ever-evolving technology.  Some will dive right in and begin to drown – overwhelmed by trying to stay afloat, while others won’t even dip their toes in.  I like the idea of diving deep in some areas while having the luxury to swim back to shore when needed.   The graphic below is a one that I found to be nice to share with colleagues who are attempting to integrate technology into their classrooms, in either a blended learning style or just wanting to try something different.

Image result for SAMR

If you are a G-Suite use the below image is very user friendly:

Image result for SAMR

Getting kids back into the  Sandbox is what I believe is important in education.  If we are not engaging our students in their learning outcomes, what type of education are they gaining?  Are they being educated?  This simply cannot be done alone, Guy Terrault spoke about Stealing out, stealing up, 21st-century skills must be modeled by teachers in order to be effectively carried out by our students.  the “stealing out, stealing up” idea models creativity and innovation.   But I wonder if the SunWest School Division’s model doesn’t fit more like the image below.  And, how many of us are already doing this in our classrooms without realizing it?  After all, aren’t you already considered a risk taker if you are incorporating some type of student-led technology in your classroom?

Image result for 21st century skills

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3 thoughts on “Unit 4: Image #2 – The Evolving Look of Today’s Classrooms”

  1. Love me some Michael Fullan, Carla, thanks! I’m glad our shift in emphasis from text to av, and from theoretical to practical has helped make things click for you!

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  2. Great analysis of Bart’s interview. That “not living in the deep end” part stood out to me, as well. I think that sometimes there’s a tendency to think that we have to be “all ed tech all the time.” There are “traditional” ways of teaching and learning that I incorporate in my classes, even my technology-based ones. I would be burnt out on technology, and so would the students, I imagine, if 100% off my time was spent in the “deep end” of these technology integration models.

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  3. I see on model “7Cs, 3Rs and 3Ms, the component of risk. I think that is essential in today’s classroom. Teacher are teaching, but they are also willing to step outside the box. Risk means the possibility of success or failure. With technology, kids are willing to risk. It’s the teacher that also has to be willing to risk. I can see you are one of those people. Keep digging in the sandbox…you never know what you might find.

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